Andersen Lab

We are using infectious disease genomics to investigate how highly pathogenic viruses such as Zika, Ebola, and Lassa emerge and cause large-scale outbreaks. Using a combination of computational biology, experimentation, and field work, our hope is to transform outbreak response and change the way we develop vaccines and therapeutics.

Roots, Not Parachutes

Rooted_CollaborationsInfectious disease outbreaks continue to pose challenges to global health and security, prompting reactive countermeasures. Recently, severe outbreaks of Ebola and Zika virus were designated by the World Health Organization as “Public Health Emergencies of International Concern.” Other emerging viral pathogens have warranted similar attention, including virus outbreaks from Lassa, Chikungunya, avian influenza, Nipah, SARS, and MERS. Additionally, endemic human pathogens, such as dengue and West Nile virus, have expanded to new regions due to changing demographics and increased urbanization. Recently there has been a lot of focus on “Parachute Research“, where foreign researchers “parachute” into countries affected by infectious disease outbreaks, such as Zika and Ebola. These researchers then conduct research in isolation, and depart without creating sustainable infrastructure or a lasting impact in the affected countries. In a recent commentary in the journal Cell, we instead advocate for the creation of long-term sustainable collaborations in outbreak-prone areas of the world.

International research collaborations are essential in combating major public health emergencies. Failure to collaborate can delay critical findings, hamper outbreak response, and erode trust between institutions and nations. In the commentary, we draw on our experience establishing the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium and the African Center of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Disease in West Africa and show how “rooted” collaborations can assist during public health emergencies. Recognizing that many successful infectious disease research collaborations exist, we highlight their critical and often unheralded role in mitigating and preventing infectious disease outbreaks.

Lab Tweets

People

Kristian

Boss Man

Michelle

Cat Herder

Refugio

Cat Herder

Nathan

Genius

Mark

Genius

Karthik

Genius

Glenn

Genius

Noodle

Supreme Commander

Publications

47
Total Papers
6
Preprints
74
Open Access
36
Glamour Journals

Genomics

66%

Immunology

17%

Other

17%

Computational Work

40%

Experimental Work

23%

Field Work

13%

Reviews/Commentaries

23%

News

Recent Posts / View All Posts

PAHO Zika numbers

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Data here. Permanent Andersen Lab project link here. Most epidemiological investigations of Zika virus during the current epidemic in the Americas requires temporal human case data. The only place to gather this information is is from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), an arm of the World Health Organization. They present Zika virus case numbers in two ways: spreadsheets of cumulative case…

Zika papers in Nature

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In a series of papers in the journals Nature and Nature Protocols, we used Zika virus sequencing from patients and mosquitos to show how the virus has spread across South America and into Florida. This work was performed as a large (huge!) collaboration of national and international institutions, which was made possible because of open science and open data.

Growing bigger

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The laboratory is still growing steadily. Mark joined us in February coming from Columbia in New York, where he did a short postdoc after having completed his PhD in Belgium. Glenn will officially join us as a graduate student in June, after having worked on multiple projects with us for a while. He’s been running the STSI main lab for…